All My Friends Live In My Phone and So Do I: Part IV

Part IV: The Anxious and the Bored
by Michael Malloy

So now we have left behind the “home computer” and are in the process of replacing the “personal computer” as the primary means of digital communication. Without delving into senseless techno-pessimism or generational abstractions, we have to ask what this technology is doing to us, and how it structures our lives.

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Poor Readers, Bad Mystics: Alex Honnold and the Heights of Masculinity

by Maru Pabón

Depending on how you see it, Alex Honnold has two ways to die: by falling off a mountain, or falling out of the frame. The first would confirm the mortality of the most gifted climber in the world; the second makes amends for its voyeuristic sins by making him immortal.

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All My Friends Live In My Phone and So Do I: Part III

Part III: Two Houses
by Michael Malloy

The establishment of the new role, the consumer of computers for the home, was only made possible by the proliferation of new form factors and roles. The demands of institutions and business became less central to the producers of home computers.

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Notified Off The Wagon

by The Collective
This article appears in our first print issue, Pattern Machines.

The on-demand delivery technology boom, the latest spawn of the gestational revolutions of the app-driven gig-economy, is in full swing. Yet alcoholism and alcohol abuse are already serious problems that are poised to be exacerbated by becoming horrific bedfellows with digital addictions.

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All My Friends Live In My Phone and So Do I: Part II

Part II: A Genealogy of Silicon
by Michael Malloy

Computers were fun once. They were fun in the way that rally cars are fun: for the people who got deeply into them, the real joy derived from learning how they worked. Computers of the past were, of course, infinitely more finicky, frustrating, and limited in all respects, disadvantaged by their miniscule memories and slow-as-molasses processors.

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All My Friends Live in My Phone and So Do I: Part I

Part I: Irresistible Impulse
by Michael Malloy

Very recently I found myself adrift, a ghost untethered from the world. I had lost my phone. I didn’t have my watch either—and so, having nothing but time, I went for a walk. It was cold, and my breath fogged in the air.

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A List of All Suspicious Deaths of Ferguson Activists

by The Collective

A string of deaths of prominent Ferguson activists and their relatives, as well as others who were murdered in a similar fashion, has left lingering questions about the circumstances.

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Checked Out on the Grand Tour

by Tyler Walicek

This fall saw the completion of my first transcontinental road trip: a two-month jaunt out of San Francisco that took my girlfriend and I along the snaking coastlines of Oregon and Washington and into the sylvan quietude of Vancouver, B.C., then on a cannonball run across the Midwest and the Great Lakes to Philadelphia, D.C., and New York City.

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The Ableist Logic of Primitivism: A Critique of “Ecoextremist” Thought

by Conor Arpwel

In his recent article for New York Magazine, Children of Ted, John H. Richardson ruminates on the recent rise of a fringe political movement centered on the writings of Ted Kaczynski, the ecoterrorist widely known as “the Unabomber.” On its face, Richardson’s article amounts to an eccentric human-interest story for a mainstream publication.

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No Apocalypse

by Michael Malloy

The world as we know it—the world of plastics, of cheap consumer goods, of the Internet—exists on a floated loan from the primordial past: a loan that has been silently accumulating interest. Our creditor, however, has not yet come to collect, and our deferments stretch on for lifetimes. We are paying for our lives in carbon, from ash to ash, dust to dust.

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